BITCHCRAFT
I got buffoons eating my pussy while I watch cartoons.






Racism and homophobia are social diseases. When only symptoms of these contagious diseases are treated, they spring up in other less obvious incarnations. No matter what we tell ourselves, we have not treated these ailments, we’ve merely mutated our racism and homophobia. We’ve trained ourselves not to use easily recognizable hate speech. Our racism has traded in the N word for coded language like “welfare queens” and our anti-gay crusaders reserve the F word for private conversation, shifting their public rhetoric to “family values.”
- Brother Ali, The Intersection of Homophobia and Hip Hop: Where Tyler Met Frank

What are your  thoughts on A$AP Rocky’s remark earlier this year that he used to be homophobic but that he’s started to change his views?


Marketing. Because on that photo shoot I did with him [with Terry Richardson for Happy Socks], he didn’t speak to me the entire time. He didn’t look at me, looked at me like I was a freak. It’s marketing. Lady Gaga showed the entertainment industry how profitable it is to have a gay fan base. Gay people usually make more money than heterosexuals. Cher knows this, Bette Middler knows this, Celine Dion knows this. Madonna, Kylie Minogue, Elton John know this. A gay fan base is a dedicated fan base that will bring you and your franchise and your production more money. It’s just an entertainment fact. Make your soft “unhomophobic” remark. I’m not trying to villainize him. I don’t know him. He may really feel that way, but do I think it’s marketing. A$AP Rocky made those comments so no one can call him homophobic now. It was safe and smart of him to do—and smart of his manager and publicist to do.

—— Mykki Blanco

Homophobic Men Most Aroused by Gay Male Porn

morethanlost:

By Nathan A. Heflick

Created Jun 9 2011 - 5:26pm

Even a man who thought that women want to have sex with their fathers, and that women spend much of their lives distraught over their lack of a penis is right sometimes. This person, the legend that is Sigmund Freud, theorized that people often have the most hateful and negative attitudes towards things they secretly crave, but feel that they shouldn’t have.

If Freud is right, then perhaps men who are the most opposed to male homosexuality have particularly strong  homosexual urges for other men.

One study  asked heterosexal men how comfortable and anxious they are around gay men. Based on these scores, they then divided these men into two groups: men that are homophobic, and men who are not. These men were then shown three, four-minute videos. One video depicted straight sex, one depicted lesbian sex and one depicted gay male sex. While this was happening, a device was attached to each participant’s penis. This device  has been found to be triggered by sexual arousal, but not other types of arousal (such as nervousness, or fear - arousal often has a very different meaning in psychology than in popular usage).

When viewing lesbian sex and straight sex, both the homophobic and the non-homophobic men showed increased penis circumference. For gay male sex, however, only the homophobic men showed heightened penis arousal.

Heterosexual men with the most anti-gay attitudes, when asked, reported not being sexually aroused by gay male sex videos. But, their penises reported otherwise.

Homophobic men were the most sexually aroused by gay male sex acts.

comingonstrong:

 
Because Tracy Morgan Isn’t Funny
 
From Black Voices – If anyone thinks this Tracy Morgan fiasco has anything to do with the controversial statements he made about gay people at a standup show on June 3 in Nashville, the joke is on them.
Stand-up comedians have always been granted a “funny pass” — unspoken permission to say offensive and controversial things about anyone and anything. But only the talented comedians get the pass, and it’s clear Morgan isn’t funny enough to receive one.A reminder about the last time a comedian without a “funny pass” said some offensive remarks about a group of people and couldn’t get anyone to buy the apology he was selling afterward.
In 2006, Michael Richards (more commonly known as “Kramer” on the sitcom ‘Seinfield’) went ballistic on a group of black hecklers at Los Angeles’ Laugh Factory. He called them the n-word, said, “50 years ago we’d have you upside down with a [expletive] fork up your [expletive].” In the days after, some attempted to come to his defense, but most of his peers knew the truth. Richards was his best as “Kramer,” a character written for him and guided by a more superior comedian, Jerry Seinfeld. Left to his own devices on the stage, Kramer lost whatever semblance he had of a career and these days he’s closer to being a civilian looking for work than a star.
Like Richards, Morgan is a comedian more known for a character he plays on television (“Tracy Jordan” on the sitcom, ’30 Rock’) than a heavyweight on the stand-up scene. Comedian W. Kamau Bell wrote on his Twitter today, “It is an open secret in Hollywood that the only person who knows how to make Tracy Morgan funny 100% of the time is Tina Fey. Not Tracy.”
The secret is open because the secret is so obvious.
Morgan’s comedy is high on absurdity but low on jokes. His HBO stand-up special last year, ‘Tracy Morgan: Black And Blue,’ was barely watchable. He was rude, offensive and foul, but hilarious? No.
Those defending Morgan are not strengthening their defense by commenting on his actual skills as a comedian. Current ‘Saturday Night Live’ cast member Jay Pharoah went on a brief rant yesterday via Twitter not to defend Morgan, but to suggest what the uproar about Morgan’s statements mean for comedians today. He wrote, “I’m not supporting anyone, I’m just saying over the past 30 years comedy has dramatically changed because people are so sensitive.”

(Continue Reading @ Black Voices…)


RE: Jay Pharoah’s comment
You can be hilarious and not be an offensive, homophobic asshole, just sayin’.

comingonstrong:

Because Tracy Morgan Isn’t Funny

From Black Voices – If anyone thinks this Tracy Morgan fiasco has anything to do with the controversial statements he made about gay people at a standup show on June 3 in Nashville, the joke is on them.

Stand-up comedians have always been granted a “funny pass” — unspoken permission to say offensive and controversial things about anyone and anything. But only the talented comedians get the pass, and it’s clear Morgan isn’t funny enough to receive one.A reminder about the last time a comedian without a “funny pass” said some offensive remarks about a group of people and couldn’t get anyone to buy the apology he was selling afterward.

In 2006, Michael Richards (more commonly known as “Kramer” on the sitcom ‘Seinfield’went ballistic on a group of black hecklers at Los Angeles’ Laugh Factory. He called them the n-word, said, “50 years ago we’d have you upside down with a [expletive] fork up your [expletive].” In the days after, some attempted to come to his defense, but most of his peers knew the truth. Richards was his best as “Kramer,” a character written for him and guided by a more superior comedian, Jerry Seinfeld. Left to his own devices on the stage, Kramer lost whatever semblance he had of a career and these days he’s closer to being a civilian looking for work than a star.

Like Richards, Morgan is a comedian more known for a character he plays on television (“Tracy Jordan” on the sitcom, ’30 Rock’) than a heavyweight on the stand-up scene. Comedian W. Kamau Bell wrote on his Twitter today, “It is an open secret in Hollywood that the only person who knows how to make Tracy Morgan funny 100% of the time is Tina Fey. Not Tracy.”

The secret is open because the secret is so obvious.

Morgan’s comedy is high on absurdity but low on jokes. His HBO stand-up special last year, ‘Tracy Morgan: Black And Blue,’ was barely watchable. He was rude, offensive and foul, but hilarious? No.

Those defending Morgan are not strengthening their defense by commenting on his actual skills as a comedian. Current ‘Saturday Night Live’ cast member Jay Pharoah went on a brief rant yesterday via Twitter not to defend Morgan, but to suggest what the uproar about Morgan’s statements mean for comedians today. He wrote, “I’m not supporting anyone, I’m just saying over the past 30 years comedy has dramatically changed because people are so sensitive.”

(Continue Reading @ Black Voices…)

RE: Jay Pharoah’s comment

You can be hilarious and not be an offensive, homophobic asshole, just sayin’.

hatari:

yourconfessions:

gopooponyourself:

They need 1 million people to sign this.

PLEASE, REBLOG THIS AND GET THE WORD OUT TO EVERYONE!

make a difference. please sign this. it’d mean the world to me.

thank you.

-Michelle

I’m pretty sure they’re misrepresenting what the bill actually stipulates but you should sign it anyway.

alexmacpherson:

I didn’t think I was asking the question in that headline but NEVER MIND here are some words on Odd Future, Lil B, Angel Haze and homophobia in hip-hop.

Excerpt:

Thousands of words have been expended on Odd Future’s lyrical content and What It All Means since their rise to prominence over the past year, but only now – as lead member Tyler, the Creator gears up for the release of his second album Goblin – have they been pressed to explain themselves. Which, in recent interviews, Tyler has done in a particularly mealy-mouthed fashion. “I’m not homophobic,” he declared to NME last week. “I just think ‘faggot’ hits and hurts people.”